1073: Weekend

Explain xkcd: It's 'cause you're dumb.
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{{comic
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That's a good way to interpret it. It's dumb, but I keep reenebmrimg a line from an episode of The Mentalist this season. Patrick Jane (the titular mentalist) told someone that if he would stop evaluating things in terms of what he likes and doesn't like, and simply sees things for what they inherently are, he would be much happier. Very insightful, and something I struggle with every day. (We all do, I suppose.) The lesson is that value is really meaningless. Nothing has value except that which you give it. Instead of going around appraising things, just live your life and be thankful.
| number    = 1073
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| date      = June 25, 2012
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| title    = Weekend
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| image    = Weekend.png
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| imagesize =
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| titletext = Of the two Garfields, you wouldn't think the cat would turn out to be the more compelling presidential speechwriter, but there you go.
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}}
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==Explanation==
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I can't find any confirmation that any of these words are references to something from former US President James Garfield or Garfield the cartoon cat. However, Garfield the cartoon cat has a a bunch of different images emphasizing the greatness of the weekend and bemoaning the existence of the first day of the work week, Monday.  
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And of course, the comic was posted on a Monday, so the comic is timed to emphasize that.
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And of course, in the first image, there is a reference to the Lover Boy song "[http://youtu.be/0-lH2nhC_R4 Everybodys Workin For the Weekend]".  "We are all working for the weekend" is a reference to the title and lyrics in the Lover Boy song which indicate that "Everybody's working for the weekend."
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{{comic discussion}}
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Revision as of 08:56, 21 September 2012

That's a good way to interpret it. It's dumb, but I keep reenebmrimg a line from an episode of The Mentalist this season. Patrick Jane (the titular mentalist) told someone that if he would stop evaluating things in terms of what he likes and doesn't like, and simply sees things for what they inherently are, he would be much happier. Very insightful, and something I struggle with every day. (We all do, I suppose.) The lesson is that value is really meaningless. Nothing has value except that which you give it. Instead of going around appraising things, just live your life and be thankful.

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