Editing 356: Nerd Sniping

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The problem Black Hat shows is an electronics engineering thought experiment to find the resistance between two points. In normal wiring, a one-ohm resistor would result in one ohm of resistance. Two resistors connected in a series, where electricity has to go through each, has two ohms of resistance. Two one-ohm resistors in parallel give the circuit only half an ohm since you average the resistance of the path (1 ohm of resistance over 2 paths). With an infinite grid of equal resistors, you have an infinite number of paths to take, and for each path an infinite number of both series and parallel paths to consider, so much more advanced methods are needed. The exact answer to the question is 4/π − 1/2 ohms, or about 0.773 ohms.  See [http://www.mathpages.com/home/kmath668/kmath668.htm Infinite Grid of Resistors].
 
The problem Black Hat shows is an electronics engineering thought experiment to find the resistance between two points. In normal wiring, a one-ohm resistor would result in one ohm of resistance. Two resistors connected in a series, where electricity has to go through each, has two ohms of resistance. Two one-ohm resistors in parallel give the circuit only half an ohm since you average the resistance of the path (1 ohm of resistance over 2 paths). With an infinite grid of equal resistors, you have an infinite number of paths to take, and for each path an infinite number of both series and parallel paths to consider, so much more advanced methods are needed. The exact answer to the question is 4/π − 1/2 ohms, or about 0.773 ohms.  See [http://www.mathpages.com/home/kmath668/kmath668.htm Infinite Grid of Resistors].
  
Black Hat explains the concept of his new sport, '''Nerd Sniping''', to [[Cueball]] while killing the physicist, but Cueball is appalled and will have no part in this sport, which doesn't make Black Hat give up on him as he suggest it would be fun if he made his own sign. Black Hat finally suggest that "physicists are two points, mathematicians three." This may indicate that he considers a mathematician to be a more difficult target for his game than a physicist would be. It is unclear whether this is meant as a dig on physicists or on mathematicians; it might be because physicists are interested in a wider range of problems, or because mathematicians require a higher-quality problem to hold their interest. Alternatively he just dislikes mathematicians more, and is thus willing to award more points for sniping one of them.
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Black Hat explains the concept of his new sport '''Nerd Sniping''' to [[Cueball]] while killing the physicist, but Cueball is appalled and will have no part in this sport, which doesn't make Black Hat give up on him as he suggest it would be fun if he made his own sign. Black Hat finally suggest that "physicists are two points, mathematicians three." This may indicate that he considers a mathematician to be a more difficult target for his game than a physicist would be. It is unclear whether this is meant as a dig on physicists or on mathematicians; it might be because physicists are interested in a wider range of problems, or because mathematicians require a higher-quality problem to hold their interest. Alternatively he just dislikes mathematicians more, and is thus willing to award more points for sniping one of them.
  
 
In the title text [[Randall]] explains that he saw this problem in a [http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2004/09/pencils-down-people.html Google Labs Aptitude Test]. This is a collection of puzzles published by {{w|Google}} as a parody of tests such as the {{w|SAT}}. Google is known for using logic & math puzzles in their job interviews.  
 
In the title text [[Randall]] explains that he saw this problem in a [http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2004/09/pencils-down-people.html Google Labs Aptitude Test]. This is a collection of puzzles published by {{w|Google}} as a parody of tests such as the {{w|SAT}}. Google is known for using logic & math puzzles in their job interviews.  

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