670: Spinal Tap Amps

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Spinal Tap Amps
Wow, that's less than $200 per... uh... that's a good deal!
Title text: Wow, that's less than $200 per... uh... that's a good deal!

[edit] Explanation

This comic is in reference to the 1984 mock documentary This Is Spinal Tap about the tour of the fictional rock band Spinal Tap. Here we see lead guitarist Nigel Tufnel (a character portrayed in the movie by Christopher Guest) explaining to Cueball how the volume dial on his amp goes all the way to eleven. This is impressive to Nigel since guitar amplifiers generally only go to ten. This leads him to believe his amp is "one" louder than other amplifiers.

In reality, the loudness of an amplifier is largely dependent on how much power it has. The highest mark on the volume dial could just as easily be labelled 'Maximum', which would then accurately describe the meaning of that setting.

The normal guy knows intuitively that using eleven is silly, and wants to know what is wrong with the usual way of numbering from one to ten -- the question that is raised in the original film.

The engineer is desperate to explain to Nigel the fallacy in his thinking, but his jargon just sends Nigel to sleep. He remains unenlightened.

The smart engineer sees an opportunity: it doesn't cost any more to number the volume dial differently, but Nigel places a real value on higher numbers. The smart engineer offers to sell him an amp that goes to twelve, but at a hefty premium.

The title text further plays on the fact that the amp's levels are on an arbitrary scale. Many products are sold at a certain price per unit weight, volume, etc. (e.g., $2.99/lb for grapes). Nigel calculates that the $2000 amp would cost less than $200 per "something", but he is unable to articulate what the "something" is (effectively, the number of notches on the dial, a unit of measure which is humorously trivial). However, he decides that it's a good deal anyway, and it looks like the smart engineer has made a sale.

[edit] Transcript

[Nigel Tufnel of Spinal Tap is showing off his amplifier to Cueball.]
Nigel: These amps go to 11.
Cueball: Is that louder?
Nigel: It's one louder.
Normal Person:
Cueball: Why not make 10 louder and make 10 the highest?
Engineer:
Cueball: But 11 doesn't have any units. It's an arbitrary scale mapping outputs—
Nigel: Zzzz
Smart Engineer:
Cueball: For $2,000 I'll build you one that goes to 12.
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Discussion

Specifically, it's $166.66 recurring per unit of loud. Thokling (talk) 22:49, 29 September 2013 (UTC)

I vote we start using "units of loud" instead of "decibels" 149.152.191.2 (talk) (please sign your comments with ~~~~)

Aye! BK201 (talk) 16:52, 12 December 2013 (UTC)BK201
I read somewhere that the amps used to have settings up to 10, but then people found ways to turn the knob past 10. It became culturally known as the 11 setting. In response, manufacturers made amps that went to 11, and this predated the movie. The movie just greatly increased the popularity of the idea. Can't find it anymore though. Maybe it was only urban legend Cflare (talk) 17:14, 16 June 2014 (UTC)
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