747: Geeks and Nerds

Explain xkcd: It's 'cause you're dumb.
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The title text gives Randall's personal definitions: geeks are people passionately into something to a greater extent than casual hobbyists, while nerds are analytical logic-oriented people, often with underdeveloped social skills.
 
The title text gives Randall's personal definitions: geeks are people passionately into something to a greater extent than casual hobbyists, while nerds are analytical logic-oriented people, often with underdeveloped social skills.
  
The comic makes the argument that if you care a lot about the distinction between a geek or a nerd, then you are way too invested in the result to not be both a geek and a nerd. There is also the possibility that you are a linguistics geek, but given the {{w|Disputes in English grammar|more pressing controversies linguistic geeks have to deal with}}, the strong interest one might have in the words "geek" and "nerd" is probably one only a nerd would have.
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The comic makes the argument that if you care a lot about the distinction between a geek or a nerd, then you are way too invested in the result to not be both a geek and a nerd. There is also the possibility that you are a linguistics geek, but given the {{w|Disputes in English grammar|more pressing controversies linguistic geeks have to deal with}}, the strong interest one might have in the words "geek" and "nerd" is probably one only a <del>nerd</del> <ins>geek</ins> would have.
  
 
==Transcript==
 
==Transcript==

Revision as of 19:29, 23 February 2013

Geeks and Nerds
The definitions I grew up with were that a geek is someone unusually into something (so you could have computer geeks, baseball geeks, theater geeks, etc) and nerds are (often awkward) science, math, or computer geeks. But definitions vary.
Title text: The definitions I grew up with were that a geek is someone unusually into something (so you could have computer geeks, baseball geeks, theater geeks, etc) and nerds are (often awkward) science, math, or computer geeks. But definitions vary.

Explanation

The words "geek" and "nerd" are both commonly used to describe people who are looked down upon due to being too intelligent and not socially conventional enough. Distinction between the two varies, but it commonly involves differences in range of interests, depth of interests, choice of hobbies, social capability, and so on.

The title text gives Randall's personal definitions: geeks are people passionately into something to a greater extent than casual hobbyists, while nerds are analytical logic-oriented people, often with underdeveloped social skills.

The comic makes the argument that if you care a lot about the distinction between a geek or a nerd, then you are way too invested in the result to not be both a geek and a nerd. There is also the possibility that you are a linguistics geek, but given the more pressing controversies linguistic geeks have to deal with, the strong interest one might have in the words "geek" and "nerd" is probably one only a nerd geek would have.

Transcript

[There is a two-circle Venn diagram; the left circle is labeled "Geeks," the right "Nerds." The intersection is labeled "People with strong opinions on the distinction between geeks and nerds."]
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Discussion

If you look at the etymology of the words it is pretty easy to figure out what they mean. Or maybe used to mean, people have the annoying habit of changing the meaning of words. Tharkon (talk) 02:03, 23 May 2014 (UTC)
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