930: Days of the Week

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Days of the Week
Not pictured: the elongated Halley's-Comet-like orbit of every Rebecca Black lyric.
Title text: Not pictured: the elongated Halley's-Comet-like orbit of every Rebecca Black lyric.

[edit] Explanation

As explained in the image, the graph is a polar graph, charting the relative strengths by which certain phrases are associated with certain days of the week. The closer a phrase comes to the center of the graph, the less the phrase is associated with whatever day of the week that is. Conversely, the further out a phrase is, the more associated with that day of the week it is.

Perhaps the clearest example of this in the above graph is the ladies night line, which has such a strong peak on Wednesday that it goes clear out of the bounds of the picture. Likewise, church is so strongly associated with Sunday that it goes off the chart there.

Also of interest are the less eccentric orbits, for instance "big day" and "so drunk." The fact that these don't clearly peak on any one day indicates that (according to Google, at least) big days are spread out fairly evenly throughout the week (with a minimum on Mondays), and so drunk tends to peak on weekends, though it seems fairly evenly split between Fridays and Saturdays.

Mentioned in the title text is Rebecca Black's viral pop hit "Friday," [1] which received considerable negative attention and ridicule for its terrible songwriting and performance. It peaks so far out that no perspective which would show it would be of any use, since many parodies have been made of the song since.

[edit] Transcript

[The whole comic is a single panel, with a circular diagram of the days of the week.]
Polar graph of what stuff happens on which days, based on number of Google results for phrases like "company meeting on <day>."
The relative frequency of <day> in <phrase> is shown by the distance from the center at which <phrase>'s line crosses <day>.
Each curve is normalized to have the same number of total hits - they're not on the same scale.
(Not easy to reproduce the actual plot, these are the phrases, in order of popularity on Wednesday.)
1. <day> is ladies night
2. announced <day>
3. company meeting on <day> / company meeting <day>
4. due on <day>
5. got laid <day>
6. drunk on <day> / so drunk <day>
7. <day> is the big day
8. Church <day>
9. got my period <day>
10. we broke up on <day>
11. <day> sucked
[Thursday, from most common to least common: 11, 2, 1, 3, 9, 4, 5, 7, 10, 6, 8]
[Friday, from most common to least common: 10, 4, 6, 7, 5, 9, 11, 3, 2, 1, 8]
[Saturday, ditto: 6, 7, 5, 11, 9, 10, 8, 3, 2, 1, 4]
[Sunday, ditto: 8, 9, 7, 11, 10, 5, 6, 2, 3, 4, 1]
[Monday, ditto: 4, 2, 9, 11, 3, 5, 10, 6, 7, 8, 1]
[Tuesday, ditto: 3, 2, 4, 5, 1, 7, 9, 10, 11, 8, 6]
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Discussion

I *might* buy the print of this, but it looks like the kind of thing that varies quickly, and I want a poster that I can refer to easily and won't become outdated after a year. Davidy²²[talk] 09:17, 9 March 2013 (UTC)
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