Talk:246: Labyrinth Puzzle

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(but in the end... it doesn't really matter! ^^)
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::There's another (more traditional) three-guard variation where one guard always tells the truth, one guard always tells a lie and the third alternates between pure truth and pure lie (and you don't know which flip they're currently flopped upon).  But you ''still'' only get to ask one question of one guard.  Have fun with that one.  My personal solution certainly has a degree of convolution, but I've heard other workable answers. [[Special:Contributions/178.98.31.27|178.98.31.27]] 02:24, 21 June 2013 (UTC)
 
::There's another (more traditional) three-guard variation where one guard always tells the truth, one guard always tells a lie and the third alternates between pure truth and pure lie (and you don't know which flip they're currently flopped upon).  But you ''still'' only get to ask one question of one guard.  Have fun with that one.  My personal solution certainly has a degree of convolution, but I've heard other workable answers. [[Special:Contributions/178.98.31.27|178.98.31.27]] 02:24, 21 June 2013 (UTC)
 
:::@‎175.110.37.200, you would know which one lies but you would not know which door leads out. [[User:Tharkon|Tharkon]] ([[User talk:Tharkon|talk]]) 23:13, 10 October 2013 (UTC)
 
:::@‎175.110.37.200, you would know which one lies but you would not know which door leads out. [[User:Tharkon|Tharkon]] ([[User talk:Tharkon|talk]]) 23:13, 10 October 2013 (UTC)
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::::Eh, well, even if you had a perfect question to ask in this case, a lot of good would that do you: it'd only reveal the truth behind the setup, that ''none'' of the doors lead out. :p -- [[Special:Contributions/173.245.51.210|173.245.51.210]] 08:20, 8 November 2013 (UTC)

Revision as of 08:20, 8 November 2013

Just ask which color is the sky.. ‎175.110.37.200 (talk) (please sign your comments with ~~~~)

Oh, although the strip doesn't explicitly say so; in those riddles you can normally only ask one question. --St.nerol (talk) 23:00, 27 January 2013 (UTC)
There's another (more traditional) three-guard variation where one guard always tells the truth, one guard always tells a lie and the third alternates between pure truth and pure lie (and you don't know which flip they're currently flopped upon). But you still only get to ask one question of one guard. Have fun with that one. My personal solution certainly has a degree of convolution, but I've heard other workable answers. 178.98.31.27 02:24, 21 June 2013 (UTC)
@‎175.110.37.200, you would know which one lies but you would not know which door leads out. Tharkon (talk) 23:13, 10 October 2013 (UTC)
Eh, well, even if you had a perfect question to ask in this case, a lot of good would that do you: it'd only reveal the truth behind the setup, that none of the doors lead out. :p -- 173.245.51.210 08:20, 8 November 2013 (UTC)
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