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==Explanation==
 
==Explanation==
"Edgelord" is modern slang describing a brash provocateur on social media; often in a satirical way that if taken literally would be found disturbing or insensitive. The term derives from the word "edgy", which is used to describe things which are designed to be provocative.
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{{incomplete|Please change this comment when editing this page. Do NOT delete this tag too soon.}}
  
In mathematics, {{w|Graph theory|graph theory}} is the study of graphs, mathematical structures made up of nodes (points) which are connected by edges (or lines).
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"Edgelord" is modern slang describing a provocateur, often one with an adolescent mindset and lacking subtlety or restraint. The term derives from the word "edgy", which is used to describe things which are designed to be provocative.
  
This comic plays on the fact that graphs have edges. Calling someone with a Graph Theory Ph.D. an 'edgelord' (a master of edges) is somewhat analogous to calling an engineering student a 'forcelord', an astronomy PhD a 'starlord', or a pharmacologist a 'druglord'.
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In mathematics, {{w|graph theory}} is the study of graphs, mathematical structures made up of nodes (points) which are connected by edges (or lines).
  
Also, [[White Hat]] seems to shout "No", and is also clenching his fists in anger, which is ironic, because he seems to be on edge. Because "edgelord" is perceived as an insult by socially aware adults, [[Cueball]] is actually provoking White Hat, making Cueball an edgelord in this interaction.  Similar situational humor is also found in [[2008: Irony Definition]].
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This comic plays on the fact that Graphs (or, at least, the objects in graphs) have edges. Saying someone with a Graph Theory Ph.D. is an 'edgelord' (a master of edges) is somewhat analogous to calling an engineering student a 'forcelord', an astronomy PhD a 'Starlord', or a pharmacologist a 'Druglord'.
  
The title text makes the same joke, except that the title would be hyperedgelord instead of edgelord. A {{w|Hypergraph|hypergraph}} is a generalization of a graph in which each edge may have more than two endpoints.
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Also, [[White Hat]] seems to shout "No", which is ironic, because he seems to be on edge. Because "edgelord" is perceived as an insult by socially aware adults, [[Cueball]] is actually provoking White Hat, making Cueball the edgelord in this interaction. Humor here also lies in that Cueball, in accusing White Hat of being an Edgelord, is being provocative himself and therefore somewhat edgy. Similar situational humor is also found in [[2008: Irony Definition]]
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The title text makes the same joke, except that the title would be Hyperedgelord (master of Hyperedges) instead of Edgelord (a master of edges that aren't hyperedges). A {{w|Hypergraph|hypergraph}} is a generalization of a graph in which each edge may have more than two endpoints.
  
 
==Transcript==
 
==Transcript==
:[Cueball is talking to White Hat, who is balling his fist and has small lines above his head to indicate annoyance.]
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:[Cueball and White Hat are standing next to each other and are discussing.]
 
:Cueball: So, I hear you're a real edgelord.
 
:Cueball: So, I hear you're a real edgelord.
 
:White Hat: '''''No!'''''
 
:White Hat: '''''No!'''''
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{{comic discussion}}
 
{{comic discussion}}
 
 
[[Category:Comics featuring Cueball]]
 
[[Category:Comics featuring Cueball]]
 
[[Category:Comics featuring White Hat]]
 
[[Category:Comics featuring White Hat]]
 
[[Category:Math]]
 
[[Category:Math]]
 
[[Category:Social interactions]]
 
[[Category:Social interactions]]

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