Editing 2488: Board Game Argument: Legacy

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Once the voting is finished, the next phase of the game is to debate which expansion packs they should collectively buy for which game.
 
Once the voting is finished, the next phase of the game is to debate which expansion packs they should collectively buy for which game.
  
A {{w|legacy game|legacy board game}} is one where players change the game itself in the course of play, such as by writing on certain cards and ripping up others, causing future sessions to be modified. A legacy game thus avoids the tendency of some games to become repetitive if they are played every week, which is a common tradition among friends or families. The meta-game this comic describes fits this definition, because the available pool of games (and expansion packs) changes based on the players' decisions. Randall refers to the “game” of choosing what to play having become repetitive. Although official legacy games are sold by the manufacturers of the original game, some players may create their own legacy versions of a game.
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A {{w|legacy game|legacy board game}} is one where players change the game itself in the course of play, such as by writing on certain cards and ripping up others, causing future sessions to be modified. A legacy game thus avoids the tendency of some games to become repetitive if they are played every week, which is a common tradition among friends or families. The meta-game this comic describes fits this definition, because the available pool of games (and expansion packs) changes based on the players' decisions. Randall refers to the “game“ of choosing what to play having become repetitive. Although official legacy games are sold by the manufacturers of the original game, some players may create their own legacy versions of a game.
  
 
The title text refers to how many board and card game owners are bothered by legacy games because they destroy game pieces. A legacy game, of course, is ''meant'' to be permanently altered, but [https://www.reddit.com/r/boardgames/comments/5oxhz2/pandemic_legacy_do_you_really_destroy_cards_or/ many players] [https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/2118913/do-you-have-destroy-cards find it hard] to perform destructive actions like cutting or tearing up cards. At an extreme, some owners wish to keep their games in as-new condition, going as far as refusing to shuffle cards in ways that bend them, or not punching tokens out of their cardboard frames. Even some games not classed as "legacy" games may have elements such as blank cards to be filled in by the players. For those who are reluctant to make changes, these items may remain blank forever. An additional layer of humour comes from the fact that it sounds like the speaker is chastising a game owner who does not want to engage with ordinary elements of the game, but instead urges them to pour soda on the game (something that would usually be an unfortunate accident). "2d6" is standard notation for games that involve rolling several different types of dice, where the first number refers to the number of dice to be rolled (in this case 2), and the second number referring to the style of dice (in this case 6-sided). That means that the player could end up pouring between 2 and 12 ounces of soda (inclusive) into their game box, depending on the total value rolled on the two 6-sided dice and assuming the dice roll directly translates to ounces.
 
The title text refers to how many board and card game owners are bothered by legacy games because they destroy game pieces. A legacy game, of course, is ''meant'' to be permanently altered, but [https://www.reddit.com/r/boardgames/comments/5oxhz2/pandemic_legacy_do_you_really_destroy_cards_or/ many players] [https://boardgamegeek.com/thread/2118913/do-you-have-destroy-cards find it hard] to perform destructive actions like cutting or tearing up cards. At an extreme, some owners wish to keep their games in as-new condition, going as far as refusing to shuffle cards in ways that bend them, or not punching tokens out of their cardboard frames. Even some games not classed as "legacy" games may have elements such as blank cards to be filled in by the players. For those who are reluctant to make changes, these items may remain blank forever. An additional layer of humour comes from the fact that it sounds like the speaker is chastising a game owner who does not want to engage with ordinary elements of the game, but instead urges them to pour soda on the game (something that would usually be an unfortunate accident). "2d6" is standard notation for games that involve rolling several different types of dice, where the first number refers to the number of dice to be rolled (in this case 2), and the second number referring to the style of dice (in this case 6-sided). That means that the player could end up pouring between 2 and 12 ounces of soda (inclusive) into their game box, depending on the total value rolled on the two 6-sided dice and assuming the dice roll directly translates to ounces.

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