Difference between revisions of "259: Clichéd Exchanges"

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(Explanation: added possible explanation of double entendre via the female name "Orly")
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"{{w|O RLY?}}" is an Internet meme typically used to express sarcastic agreement with or feigned surprise at a statement. The typical response to "O RLY" is usually "YA RLY", "NO WAI" or "SRSLY?" These exchanges are SMS abbreviations for "Oh really?", "Yeah really", "No way!", and "Seriously?" respectively.
 
"{{w|O RLY?}}" is an Internet meme typically used to express sarcastic agreement with or feigned surprise at a statement. The typical response to "O RLY" is usually "YA RLY", "NO WAI" or "SRSLY?" These exchanges are SMS abbreviations for "Oh really?", "Yeah really", "No way!", and "Seriously?" respectively.
  
However, [[Cueball]]'s response avoids this typical exchange, instead replying with another cliché, the double entendre. A double entendre is a phrase which has two intended meanings: one innocent, the other lewd. The comedy comes from the ambiguous meaning.
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However, [[Cueball]]'s response avoids this typical exchange, instead replying with another cliché, derived from a classic double entendre.
  
A classic example of a double entendre: "If I told you you had a beautiful body, would you hold it against me?" The innocent meaning of this phrase is "If I complimented you on your looks, would you be off-put by my forward behavior?" The lewd meaning of the phrase is "You look incredibly sexy, and I would like to make out/have sex with you," referring to the literal holding of bodies against each other.
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In this cliché, the speaker responds to a statement containing a word ending with '-er', and turns it into a sexual reference. The setup is as follows:
 
 
Another classic double entendre is to respond to a statement containing a word ending with '-er', and turn it into a sex reference. The setup is as follows:
 
  
 
: '''Alan:''' ''"Do you want to come over to my house? My wife and I are playing poker."''
 
: '''Alan:''' ''"Do you want to come over to my house? My wife and I are playing poker."''
 
: '''Bob:''' ''"Poker? I hardly KNOW her!"''
 
: '''Bob:''' ''"Poker? I hardly KNOW her!"''
  
Such a double entendre makes no sense in the context of an O RLY exchange. In the case of the comic, the non-sequitur will likely baffle the person on the left and derail the conversation, to the amusement of the person on the right. The reason [[Randall]] makes this a hobby is that it bores him when people fall back on clichés for comedy, and he seeks inventive ways to humor himself in these situations.
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Such a double entendre makes no sense in the context of an O RLY exchange. In the case of the comic, the non-sequitur will likely baffle the person on the left and derail the conversation, to the amusement of the person on the right. The reason [[Randall]] makes this a hobby is, presumably, that it bores him when people fall back on clichés for comedy, and he seeks inventive ways to humor himself in these situations. ''See'''', for example'', https://xkcd.com/16/.
 
 
Alternatively, the double entendre might have a sense in this context, if one assumes that the author meant a Hebrew female name "Orly".
 
  
 
The title text takes the real cliché "fight fire with fire," and combines it with the more literal "fight clichés with clichés." The resulting statement follows a very similar principle to the situation in the comic proper.
 
The title text takes the real cliché "fight fire with fire," and combines it with the more literal "fight clichés with clichés." The resulting statement follows a very similar principle to the situation in the comic proper.

Revision as of 22:41, 31 October 2015

Clichéd Exchanges
It's like they say, you gotta fight fire with clichés.
Title text: It's like they say, you gotta fight fire with clichés.

Explanation

Another entry into the My Hobby series.

"O RLY?" is an Internet meme typically used to express sarcastic agreement with or feigned surprise at a statement. The typical response to "O RLY" is usually "YA RLY", "NO WAI" or "SRSLY?" These exchanges are SMS abbreviations for "Oh really?", "Yeah really", "No way!", and "Seriously?" respectively.

However, Cueball's response avoids this typical exchange, instead replying with another cliché, derived from a classic double entendre.

In this cliché, the speaker responds to a statement containing a word ending with '-er', and turns it into a sexual reference. The setup is as follows:

Alan: "Do you want to come over to my house? My wife and I are playing poker."
Bob: "Poker? I hardly KNOW her!"

Such a double entendre makes no sense in the context of an O RLY exchange. In the case of the comic, the non-sequitur will likely baffle the person on the left and derail the conversation, to the amusement of the person on the right. The reason Randall makes this a hobby is, presumably, that it bores him when people fall back on clichés for comedy, and he seeks inventive ways to humor himself in these situations. See', for example, https://xkcd.com/16/.

The title text takes the real cliché "fight fire with fire," and combines it with the more literal "fight clichés with clichés." The resulting statement follows a very similar principle to the situation in the comic proper.

Transcript

My Hobby:
Derailing clichéd exchanges by using the wrong replies
Friend: O RLY?
Cueball: O RLY? I 'ardly know 'er!


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Discussion

Is this correction satisfactory? Can I remove the tag? ImVeryAngryItsNotButter (talk) 00:54, 8 March 2014 (UTC)

I removed it, because it looks good to me. 108.162.250.219 13:32, 12 March 2014 (UTC)

I thought the cliche being referred to was "wrecked 'em? I hardly knew 'em!" (a double entendre on "rectum" ) http://ask.metafilter.com/122210/JokeFilter-What-is-the-origin-of-the-joke-with-the-punchline-rectum-damn-near-killed-him 66.202.132.250 14:25, 5 April 2013 (UTC)

In my experience it's a general "<tagword>, I hardly knew(/know) her(/him)", where the tagword is an -er/-im word and can (by sheer force of will, often groan-worthy) be taken as a double-entendre spawn. e.g. "Which cathedral is that in the picture?" "Chester." "Chester? I hardly know 'er!" (The worse the better, arguably, but that example's probably too flat.)
Your form follows alongside of that. But this cliché is the mismatched follow-up, only sparked off (albeit by deliberate disassociation) by the "O RLY?" cliché as feed-line. 178.98.31.27 10:30, 20 June 2013 (UTC)

The double entendre in this case is O RLY ~ orally? Undee (talk) 11:24, 18 October 2013 (UTC)

I never thought of it as a double entendre- I thought it was a play on words of Irish names,(as evidenced by the ommision of the first letter in some words) i.e. O'reilly. In this case, it would be "O'reilly? I 'ardly know 'er!" 108.162.221.243 (talk) (please sign your comments with ~~~~)

The fact that this is a collaborative wiki doesn't not mean you should put in every ludicrous and idiosyncratic interpretation that has special meaning to you and clearly has nothing to do with what Randall, or people in the rest of the world, understood the comic to be. O RLY is not a reference to an Irish name, or a Hebrew name, or anything at all other than the eminently popular O RLY meme. Period. Leave your personal nonsense out of this wiki. 108.162.214.143 (talk) (please sign your comments with ~~~~)

Since I am another that first thought of the Irish name and not a meme I have never heard of perhaps you should be the one to keep your personal nonsense out of this wiki. I have read most of the explains on this site and you are the first that I have seen that has targeted any single person for an attack like this. Also learn to sign wiki comments 162.158.62.231 12:47, 7 July 2017 (UTC)

Just because you haven't heard of it doesn't mean no-one else has. I hadn't come across the subject meme, but I didn't assume that it was an appalling misspelling of O'Reilly. In addition, the person you're defending also hasn't learnt how to sign off Wiki-article comments, so it might be helpful if you were slightly less inconsistent with which parts of an argument you use. 162.158.62.231 19:01, 23 April 2018 (UTC)