Editing 379: Forgetting

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==Explanation==
 
==Explanation==
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[[Cueball]] is writing a piece of code (probably in the programming language {{w|C++}}) which removes an item from a data structure called a {{w|Linked list}} (the first two lines of the text). Then, he writes a {{w|Comment (computer programming)|comment}} (which is delimited by the double slashes) relating the code to his personal life. Finally, he adds an {{w|Assertion (computing)|assertion}}, which is normally a formal specification of a condition which should always be true (with which the programmer ensures that e.g. mass is not negative). But in this case, instead of asserting a software-related predicate, he asserts that "it's going to be okay" - and because of how {{w|String literal|string literals}} are treated by the interpreter, the assertion will be true.
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[[Cueball]] is writing a piece of code (probably in the programming language C++ or {{w|PHP}}) which removes an item from a data structure called a {{w|Linked list}} (the first two lines of the text). Then, he writes a {{w|Comment (computer programming)|comment}} (which is delimited by the double slashes) relating the code to his personal life. Finally, he adds an {{w|Assertion (computing)|assertion}}, which is normally a formal specification of a condition which should always be true (with which the programmer ensures that e.g. mass is not negative). But in this case, instead of asserting a software-related predicate, he asserts that "it's going to be okay" - and because of how {{w|String literal|string literals}} are treated by the interpreter, the assertion will be true.
  
 
An "assert" is a programming statement that allows you to insert sanity checks into your code. For example, if you were writing a program to calculate the speed of a neutrino, then at the end of the calculation you could say:   
 
An "assert" is a programming statement that allows you to insert sanity checks into your code. For example, if you were writing a program to calculate the speed of a neutrino, then at the end of the calculation you could say:   

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