Editing Talk:1459: Documents

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:: Could be a JPEG because it's a camera photo of the address on something. That'd make it even more perverse because most cameras create files with names like DSC01234.jpg meaning he's given it the "Untitled" moniker on purpose. [[Special:Contributions/141.101.99.78|141.101.99.78]] 14:23, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
 
:: Could be a JPEG because it's a camera photo of the address on something. That'd make it even more perverse because most cameras create files with names like DSC01234.jpg meaning he's given it the "Untitled" moniker on purpose. [[Special:Contributions/141.101.99.78|141.101.99.78]] 14:23, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
 
::: It's a screenshot. [[Special:Contributions/173.245.62.169|173.245.62.169]] 18:15, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
 
::: It's a screenshot. [[Special:Contributions/173.245.62.169|173.245.62.169]] 18:15, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
::: Screenshots begin with "IMG_XXXX". [[Special:Contributions/108.162.216.41|108.162.216.41]] 05:23, 26 December 2014 (UTC)
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: Placing an email address in a graphic is often used when the email address is to be displayed on a web page to make it difficult for email-address harvesting programs to grab the email address for spamming. But that's probably not relevant here.--[[User:RenniePet|RenniePet]] ([[User talk:RenniePet|talk]]) 15:28, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
: Placing an address in a graphic is often used when the address is to be displayed on a web page to make it difficult for -address harvesting programs to grab the address for spamming. But that's probably not relevant here.--[[User:RenniePet|RenniePet]] ([[User talk:RenniePet|talk]]) 15:28, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
 
  
 
Something I come a cross now and then is the result of the following situation: You are in the process of selecting multiple files while holding CTRL. During the process of quickly selecting the next file, you accidentally move your cursor/mouse while clicking the next file, resulting in copying all the selected files on the same location :) [[User:SirKitKat|sirKitKat]] ([[User talk:SirKitKat|talk]]) 13:36, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
 
Something I come a cross now and then is the result of the following situation: You are in the process of selecting multiple files while holding CTRL. During the process of quickly selecting the next file, you accidentally move your cursor/mouse while clicking the next file, resulting in copying all the selected files on the same location :) [[User:SirKitKat|sirKitKat]] ([[User talk:SirKitKat|talk]]) 13:36, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
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[[User:Chaosadventurer|Chaosadventurer]] ([[User talk:Chaosadventurer|talk]]) 15:34, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
 
[[User:Chaosadventurer|Chaosadventurer]] ([[User talk:Chaosadventurer|talk]]) 15:34, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
 
:Technically, Windows can handle paths longer than 260 characters (the definition of MAX_PATH in Windows API), but it requires special nomenclature (eg. "\\?\D:\very-long-path), and each individual backslash-delimited component is still limited to 255 chars.  The maximum length of that type of path is 32,767 characters AFTER Unicode expansion.  Most Unix-based file systems have a max filename length of 255 chars and a max path length of 4,096 chars. [[User:KieferSkunk|KieferSkunk]] ([[User talk:KieferSkunk|talk]]) 20:54, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
 
:Technically, Windows can handle paths longer than 260 characters (the definition of MAX_PATH in Windows API), but it requires special nomenclature (eg. "\\?\D:\very-long-path), and each individual backslash-delimited component is still limited to 255 chars.  The maximum length of that type of path is 32,767 characters AFTER Unicode expansion.  Most Unix-based file systems have a max filename length of 255 chars and a max path length of 4,096 chars. [[User:KieferSkunk|KieferSkunk]] ([[User talk:KieferSkunk|talk]]) 20:54, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
::Mostly correct, ReFS supports up to 32,767 Unicode characters, but is limited in Windows 8/8.1(and I guess by extention 2012 and 2012 R2) to 255 characters. Most filesystems specify bytes and not characters, so it could vary based on if it's unicode or not. [[User:TuxyQ|TuxyQ]] ([[User talk:TuxyQ|talk]]) 09:57, 17 December 2014 (UTC)
 
  
 
I suppose it's just the OCD but the fact that the filenames are not in alphabetical order is the first thing that hit me. They're not even alphabetical by file type/extension. About the only thing that would result in this ordering is if the files were sorted by timestamp (which we don't see). Of course, if I were looking over someone's shoulder at their timestamp sorted list of files, I might be just as horrified by the ordering as I would by the names.
 
I suppose it's just the OCD but the fact that the filenames are not in alphabetical order is the first thing that hit me. They're not even alphabetical by file type/extension. About the only thing that would result in this ordering is if the files were sorted by timestamp (which we don't see). Of course, if I were looking over someone's shoulder at their timestamp sorted list of files, I might be just as horrified by the ordering as I would by the names.
 
[[User:MrBigDog2U|MrBigDog2U]] ([[User talk:MrBigDog2U|talk]]) 15:40, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
 
[[User:MrBigDog2U|MrBigDog2U]] ([[User talk:MrBigDog2U|talk]]) 15:40, 12 December 2014 (UTC)
:Sometimes it is useful to sort by timestamp.  When looking for the file, for example.  Given the filenames are near useless in this example, sorting by timestamp could be the easiest way to find something.  ("I'm looking for the fine I worked on about two weeks ago.") -- Equinox [[Special:Contributions/199.27.128.117|199.27.128.117]] 18:53, 12 December 2014 (UTC)   
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:Sometimes it is useful to sort by timestamp.  When looking for the latest file, for example.  Given the filenames are near useless in this example, sorting by timestamp could be the easiest way to find something.  ("I'm looking for the fine I worked on about two weeks ago.") -- Equinox [[Special:Contributions/199.27.128.117|199.27.128.117]] 18:53, 12 December 2014 (UTC)   
  
 
Does anyone know why "Untitled 241.doc" and "Untitled 40 MOM ADRESS.jpg" are out of order. The rest seem to be in accending order? {{unsigned ip|108.162.221.135}}
 
Does anyone know why "Untitled 241.doc" and "Untitled 40 MOM ADRESS.jpg" are out of order. The rest seem to be in accending order? {{unsigned ip|108.162.221.135}}
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Could the alt text be a reference to "successor of" notation from set theory. I'm not an expert at all, but the explicit use of "copy of" over and over makes sense as another mathematical but absurd document naming schema. I think it's called successor ordinals or something like that. {{unsigned ip|173.245.50.179}}
 
Could the alt text be a reference to "successor of" notation from set theory. I'm not an expert at all, but the explicit use of "copy of" over and over makes sense as another mathematical but absurd document naming schema. I think it's called successor ordinals or something like that. {{unsigned ip|173.245.50.179}}
 
The "copy of copy of copy of" thing is actually a quirk related to passing around files via  (happens often within an office network) where the other person does not save the file but rather opens it first then proceeds to save it after reading/editing, since MS Office has originally designated that file as 'from another computer'/read only, it will add the prefix 'copy of' to properly save a copy of the original file. This file is then further forwarded to someone else, continuing the chain. In a file that is heavily edited you can often get names with 4 of 5 "copy of"s before the actual name.
 
 
Someone may want to edit the explanation to add this detail as it is the most common reason for multiple "copy of"s in front of each other.
 
[[User:TjPhysicist|TjPhysicist]] ([[User talk:TjPhysicist|talk]]) 05:28, 19 December 2014 (UTC)
 
 
A more likely/common reason for "copy of copy of copy of" relates to files opened directly from  programs (instead of saved then opened), upon saving them after editing like this the phrase "copy of" will be added to the filename indicating that this is a copy of the original file (the original file being somewhere in a temp folder, since it was never saved). This trend often continues, especially in office settings, where files are passed around via  a lot, every user that edits it adding one extra "copy of". Editing to mention this
 
 
[[User:TjPhysicist|TjPhysicist]] ([[User talk:TjPhysicist|talk]]) 05:42, 19 December 2014 (UTC)
 
 
"Copy of copy of copy of copy ..." also reminded me of NIN song "Copy of a" (http://youtu.be/pVB_DI4ajKA)
 
[[Special:Contributions/141.101.93.218|141.101.93.218]] 20:06, 3 January 2015 (UTC)
 
 
The "Untitled 40 Mom Address looks like a "yo mom address" [[User:SilverMagpie|SilverMagpie]] ([[User talk:SilverMagpie|talk]]) 20:33, 16 November 2016 (UTC)
 

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