Difference between revisions of "Talk:2132: Percentage Styles"

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* almost 2/3rds
 
* almost 2/3rds
 
* 65¢^-1; 65¢⁻¹
 
* 65¢^-1; 65¢⁻¹
* 65 pennies on the dollar
+
* 65 pennies on the dollar; 65 cents on the dollar
 
* 13/20
 
* 13/20
 
* \SI{65}{\per\cent}
 
* \SI{65}{\per\cent}
 +
* LXV/C (Like the ancient Romans would write.)
  
 
[[Special:Contributions/162.158.79.191|162.158.79.191]] 19:35, 3 April 2019 (UTC)
 
[[Special:Contributions/162.158.79.191|162.158.79.191]] 19:35, 3 April 2019 (UTC)
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“In Classical Latin, "C" is always pronounced like "K".” – that’s wrong. It depends on the school (and maybe also the country). Where I learned Latin, most ''c'' were pronounced like the German ''z'' (for example in Caesar). --[[User:DaB.|DaB.]] ([[User talk:DaB.|talk]]) 13:01, 5 April 2019 (UTC)
 
“In Classical Latin, "C" is always pronounced like "K".” – that’s wrong. It depends on the school (and maybe also the country). Where I learned Latin, most ''c'' were pronounced like the German ''z'' (for example in Caesar). --[[User:DaB.|DaB.]] ([[User talk:DaB.|talk]]) 13:01, 5 April 2019 (UTC)
 +
: That's not classical Latin - that's vulgar Latin. The classical Latin C derived from the Greek gamma, and is pronounced like 'K' - you can even see the derivation in the shape of the letter. You are conflating vulgar with classical here. [[User:Hyperum|Hyperum]] ([[User talk:Hyperum|talk]]) 04:34, 10 April 2019 (UTC)
  
== Fungus Hack Review ==
+
{{reply to|108.162.241.52}} IP 108.162.241.52, please do not """"correct"""" the pronunciation of kaiser (Caesar) to 'keezer' again. That isn't how Latin is pronounced. [[User:Hyperum|Hyperum]] ([[User talk:Hyperum|talk]]) 04:34, 10 April 2019 (UTC)
  
I know a lot of people have brands [https://losconcepto.com/fungus-hack-review/ Fungus Hack ] that they try and they feel like if they are spending their money on a brand like Nike or New Balance or something like that they automatically getting the right shoe which isn't the case. There are so many different brands out there and it's kind of a whirlwind to try to decide what to buy, each brand has six or seven different types of shoes.
+
== centum vs. cent vs. penny ==
  
So just buying a Nike for example, doesn't mean you're getting the shoe that's right for you because they have minimalist shoes, they have shoes for runners, hikers, people who over pronate and people who have high arches. There's a lot of more to the anatomy of a shoe than just pulling it off at the shelf and a lot of people don't understand that.
+
In this context, "cent" is an abbreviation for the Latin word "centum", meaning 100. In English, the word "cent" means 1/100th of a dollar, which is one of the three official versions of the currency of the United States. They are: dollars, dimes, and cents. Substituting cent (currency) for cent (abbreviation for "centum") is a malapropism. But "penny" refers to British currency, not American. The penny (plural:pence) was 1/240 of a pound until decimalization in the 1970s, and 1/100 of a pound thereafter. Americans often refer to a one-cent coin as a "penny", but this is just a nickname, not the actual name of the coin or the value of the coin. The name of the coin is one cent. Its value is 1 cent, which equals 1/10 of a dime, or 1/100 of a dollar. Changing centum --> cent--> penny would be a double malapropism.
  
Doctor, to wrap this up, how should someone go about choosing a Podiatrist? Dr. Gillroy: Well, that's a tough one. Historically, Podiatrists have had different levels of training, for example, in the past not all podiatrists were surgically trained. Some of them specialized more in general podiatric medicine and palliative foot care and others focused on diabetic foot care and wound healing. The training is more uniform now. Every podiatrist that graduates now has 3 years of surgical training in addition to the general podiatric training. So now that it's more uniform, you can trust that your podiatrist can help with your foot problem and see you through to complete healing.
+
This begs the question, how far can we push beyond the boundaries of reason? Indeed, that is the entire spirit of Randall's premise here. Why stop with a double malapropism? We could use centum --> cent --> scent. Heck, why not centum --> cent --> penny --> penne --> macaroni --> Marconi --> Tesla. Where do we stop? Common sense tells me I'm way over the line. But common cents tell me nothing.[[Special:Contributions/162.158.107.79|162.158.107.79]] 14:31, 8 April 2019 (UTC)
 
+
:My sarcasm detector has finally broke. [[User:Netherin5|“That Guy from the Netherlands”]] ([[User talk:Netherin5|talk]]) 14:32, 8 April 2019 (UTC)
So in other words what you're saying is that the training and the curriculum is now pretty standardized. If you get somebody who is a podiatrist that is licensed in the last 10 years they're going to have that training. Is that correct? Dr. Gillroy: Yes. Most importantly, I just think you need to find someone that you have a good relationship with you so that if you do have a chronic problem then they are someone that you can trust. Look for a podiatrist that has good bedside manner and who spends time explaining things to you. Sure, absolutely. When people are dealing with a situation where they're going to have to come back to the doctor again and again, you're right, it does turn into a very personal relationship. They're going to want somebody who they're comfortable with.
 
 
 
 
 
[https://losconcepto.com/fungus-hack-review/ https://losconcepto.com/fungus-hack-review/]
 
 
 
== Lutazene Review ==
 
 
 
Glaucoma is a group of [https://healthreviewfactory.com/lutazene-review/ Lutazene] diseases with a major characteristic of an optic neuropathy or damage of the optic nerve which transports visual images from the nerve fibers in the retina to the brain. Though painless, glaucoma can be very fatal, leading to permanent loss of vision when it is not attended to medically at the early stage of its development. It is mostly detected through structural change or functional anomaly. Medical researchers in the field of ophthalmology attributes the primary cause of glaucoma to the inner destruction of the optic nerve which results in an increased pressure of the aqueous humor fluid known medically as intraocular pressure (IOP).
 
 
 
Usually, when the mesh-like channel of the anterior chamber where the aqueous humor fluid penetrates is blocked, it starts damaging the optic nerve that eventually results in glaucoma. Researchers at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Centre have recently discovered that glaucoma is caused by an immune response to an early exposure to bacteria which causes higher rise in the pressure in the optic nerve of the eye, triggering heat shock proteins. When the heat shock proteins are detected by the memory T cells, they wrongly label the neurons in the retina as foreign materials, resulting in an autoimmune attack which eventually causes glaucoma.
 
 
 
Early symptoms of glaucoma include tumor, advanced cataract, inflammation of the eye, eye redness, stinging of the eye, nausea, vomiting, severe eye infection, seeing of halos or coloured rings around lights, and loss of the peripheral. People with diabetes are susceptible to glaucoma infection. Also, persons with a family history of glaucoma are likely to get infected through hereditary. It has been noted that the taking of certain steroids such as prednisone could trigger glaucoma attack. At its early stages, glaucoma is treated with the use of eye drops such as prostaglandin analogues, beta blockers, carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, and cholinergic agents. At its acute stage, microsurgery of the eye may be performed.
 
 
 
 
 
[https://healthreviewfactory.com/lutazene-review/ https://healthreviewfactory.com/lutazene-review/]
 
 
 
== Alphanation Combat Fighter Review ==
 
 
 
I have dehydrated blueberries, [https://cbsecure.co.uk/alphanation-combat-fighter-review/ Alphanation Combat Fighter ]  cherries, apples, carrots, potatoes, onions, and beef. You will need to remove the pit from cherries before drying. Cherries (after pitting) and blueberries should be dried whole. Core the apples and slice apples, carrots, onions and potatoes to about 1/4" thick. I rinse them in lemon juice to help prevent them from turning brown. I suggest you dry onions separately from other fruits or veggies as the onions can add their flavor to your fruit. Place them in rows on your wire mesh and place on your oven racks. Set the oven temp on about 90 to 100 degrees and that's it. Drying time for fruits and vegetables does vary from a few hours to a day or more. After they are finished in the oven I remove them and put them in paper bags to sit for a few days to allow any residual moisture evaporate. Then I put meal size portions in bags and vacuum seal them.
 
 
 
Drying meat is a little more involved. Typical meats used for drying are beef, venison, goat, sheep, or moose, as well as some others. Use only lean meat and trim any fat prior to drying. Fat turns rancid and will spoil your meat. I like to cut meat into about 1/4" thick strips, jerky sized pieces. Meats should be soaked in salt water brine (about 5-10 minutes) or rubbed with salt prior to drying. Do not use iodized salt. Salt helps to remove excess moisture from them meat and acts as a preservative. Oven temperature should be set between 60 and 70 degrees. Meat sometimes takes a day or longer to dehydrate sufficiently. I let my meats air dry a few days before sealing. Vacuum seal and date your package.
 
 
 
With just these few dried foods I can make a stew and have dried fruit for dessert, a good balanced meal. Of course I also purchase organic dry foods in bulk and vacuum package, such as, flour, pancake mix, beans, pasta, coffee, dry milk, sugar, spices, herbs, etc. My food supply also contains a good supply of organic heirloom seeds. If times get rough, my family will eat! And if the worst case scenario does not materialize, then I have a wonderful supply of easy to carry foods for camping and backpacking trips.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[https://cbsecure.co.uk/alphanation-combat-fighter-review/ https://cbsecure.co.uk/alphanation-combat-fighter-review/]
 

Latest revision as of 04:34, 10 April 2019


The only proper style for Britain and the US is ‘%65’. Aasasd (talk) 16:20, 3 April 2019 (UTC)

O RLY? 108.162.241.52 16:37, 3 April 2019 (UTC)
Yes. You don't write ‘65$’, do you? British/US standards should be followed properly and consistently. Aasasd (talk) 17:19, 3 April 2019 (UTC)
If there is any consistency, it is that unit follows numbers. 3', 2 m, 40 lbs, 2 l, and so on. Currency is the exception. --Klausok (talk) 10:33, 4 April 2019 (UTC)
I've definitely seen %NN stated by style guides, but I almost never see anybody using it, because reading it aloud encourages saying it as "percent sixty-five". Oddly, people seem to have no trouble remembering to write $65 instead of 65$, despite the same "dollars sixty-five" vs "sixty-five dollars" vocalization issue. Perhaps it's because we often see things like $65.95 but %65.95 is used less often? Writing 65.95% is potentially ambiguous depending on how it's read out loud: "sixty-five point ninety-five percent" could definitely be misinterpreted very easily. 65.95$ is definitely not ideal, & $65.95¢ is somehow even worse. How about 65$.95¢? ;S
ProphetZarquon (talk) 17:08, 3 April 2019 (UTC)
At https://ask.metafilter.com/7894/Is-the-form-of-100-instead-of-100-a-different-language-useage discussers encountered %NN but eventually decided it was a mistake spread by low literacy. More common is "NNpc". 172.69.63.47 20:33, 3 April 2019 (UTC)



There's also 65/100, 65:100, \textstyle\frac{65}{100}, sixtyfive-hundreth, 0.65, and point sixty-five. Benny. 16:41, 3 April 2019 (UTC)

There's also 650‰ 172.69.33.41 16:52, 3 April 2019 (UTC)

Wouldn't that be 650 hundredths? I've seen "and sixty-five ‰" a cheque before. ProphetZarquon (talk) 17:08, 3 April 2019 (UTC)
"650‰" is "650 per mille (per thousand)", and is precisely the same as "65%". RandalSchwartz (talk) 19:42, 3 April 2019 (UTC)

Even lower than 65 per¢ should be 65 per penny. -boB (talk) 20:00, 3 April 2019 (UTC)

==[edit]

BTW, I can imagine the transcript of this one posing some challenge for screen readers. Aasasd (talk) 17:01, 3 April 2019 (UTC) \´65

On a second thought, I can also imagine people who use screen readers never hearing any difference between the writing styles listed in the comic. Aasasd (talk) 17:24, 3 April 2019 (UTC)

This may have come up because last Friday the A.P. Stylebook announced their changes for 2019, including a change to percent. https://www.poynter.org/reporting-editing/2019/ap-says-the-percentage-sign-now-ok-when-used-with-a-numeral-thats-shift5/

Missing[edit]

Compile here the missing styles:

  •  %65
  • 65 pc, 65 pct, 65 pct., 65 cent
  • sixty-five percent; sixty-five per cent; sixty-five per ¢
  • sixty-five per hundred; 65 for every 100
  • 65% percent; 65% per cent; 65% per ¢
  • 65/100; 65÷100; 65:100; 65 x 1/100
  • 65*10^-2; 65×10⁻²; 65×10^-2; 65*10⁻²; 6.5e-1
  • 0.65; 0,65
  • 65 per penny (wasn't this a joke?)
  • almost 2/3rds
  • 65¢^-1; 65¢⁻¹
  • 65 pennies on the dollar; 65 cents on the dollar
  • 13/20
  • \SI{65}{\per\cent}
  • LXV/C (Like the ancient Romans would write.)

162.158.79.191 19:35, 3 April 2019 (UTC)

Also 6.5e-1. -- Hkmaly (talk) 23:29, 3 April 2019 (UTC)
Also simply 'cent,' which is used in property tax assessment in California. It's a pretty sneaky way to make the tax seem really small. --

Yeah, Randall dropped the ball on this one. I am disappoint. At the very least there should have been an entry where "per" was written as "/". Also since the cent sign is not on most keyboards but the dollar sign is, I would have expected "6500/$". Also, google agrees: https://www.google.com/search?q=6500%2F%24+in+cent^-1 :p 141.101.96.187 07:30, 4 April 2019 (UTC)

I was waiting for 650‰ or even 6500‱. Maybe next time. JohnHawkinson (talk) 23:13, 5 April 2019 (UTC)

= Celtic =[edit]

I suggest you remove the reference to "celtic". In modern English it's rarely pronounced "seltic" except in the names of a couple of sports teams. There is a substantial discussion of this online - just Google "pronounce celtic". Irish people are Celtic and almost zero Irish say "seltic" - except in relation to Glasgow Celtic football club. 162.158.38.190 08:28, 4 April 2019 (UTC)

oops! I figured because I learned Latin and was the only person who said 'keltic' when I saw a sports team, that I was wrong! 162.158.78.58 11:22, 4 April 2019 (UTC)

}][{4³²1

Narrow non-breaking space missing[edit]

Randall disappoints tbh. The omly proper way would be 65 %. --172.68.50.160 22:52, 4 April 2019 (UTC)

C in Latin[edit]

“In Classical Latin, "C" is always pronounced like "K".” – that’s wrong. It depends on the school (and maybe also the country). Where I learned Latin, most c were pronounced like the German z (for example in Caesar). --DaB. (talk) 13:01, 5 April 2019 (UTC)

That's not classical Latin - that's vulgar Latin. The classical Latin C derived from the Greek gamma, and is pronounced like 'K' - you can even see the derivation in the shape of the letter. You are conflating vulgar with classical here. Hyperum (talk) 04:34, 10 April 2019 (UTC)

Template:reply to IP 108.162.241.52, please do not """"correct"""" the pronunciation of kaiser (Caesar) to 'keezer' again. That isn't how Latin is pronounced. Hyperum (talk) 04:34, 10 April 2019 (UTC)

centum vs. cent vs. penny[edit]

In this context, "cent" is an abbreviation for the Latin word "centum", meaning 100. In English, the word "cent" means 1/100th of a dollar, which is one of the three official versions of the currency of the United States. They are: dollars, dimes, and cents. Substituting cent (currency) for cent (abbreviation for "centum") is a malapropism. But "penny" refers to British currency, not American. The penny (plural:pence) was 1/240 of a pound until decimalization in the 1970s, and 1/100 of a pound thereafter. Americans often refer to a one-cent coin as a "penny", but this is just a nickname, not the actual name of the coin or the value of the coin. The name of the coin is one cent. Its value is 1 cent, which equals 1/10 of a dime, or 1/100 of a dollar. Changing centum --> cent--> penny would be a double malapropism.

This begs the question, how far can we push beyond the boundaries of reason? Indeed, that is the entire spirit of Randall's premise here. Why stop with a double malapropism? We could use centum --> cent --> scent. Heck, why not centum --> cent --> penny --> penne --> macaroni --> Marconi --> Tesla. Where do we stop? Common sense tells me I'm way over the line. But common cents tell me nothing.162.158.107.79 14:31, 8 April 2019 (UTC)

My sarcasm detector has finally broke. “That Guy from the Netherlands” (talk) 14:32, 8 April 2019 (UTC)