Editing 157: Filler Art

Jump to: navigation, search

Warning: You are not logged in.

Your IP address will be recorded in this page's edit history.
The edit can be undone. Please check the comparison below to verify that this is what you want to do, and then save the changes below to finish undoing the edit.
Latest revision Your text
Line 10: Line 10:
 
There are times in which the owner of a webcomic can not make a comic on time for the next scheduled update (for example, needing to attend to a family emergency). Some deal with these situations by creating a "buffer" of comics (that is, making several comics ahead of time) in anticipation for these events. However, if the buffer runs out (or if there was no buffer in the first place), the owner might have to resort to uploading whatever is available (e.g. concept art, random sketches, a draft of the planned comic, etc.). Many webcomic owners prefer to upload filler art so that their more fickle fans can see that they have not abandoned the comic.
 
There are times in which the owner of a webcomic can not make a comic on time for the next scheduled update (for example, needing to attend to a family emergency). Some deal with these situations by creating a "buffer" of comics (that is, making several comics ahead of time) in anticipation for these events. However, if the buffer runs out (or if there was no buffer in the first place), the owner might have to resort to uploading whatever is available (e.g. concept art, random sketches, a draft of the planned comic, etc.). Many webcomic owners prefer to upload filler art so that their more fickle fans can see that they have not abandoned the comic.
  
Here, [[Randall]] parodies this situation with two separate punchlines. First, he tells us that he has to go to the doctor to get his thighs rotated, which is medically unnecessary (as a "thigh rotation" is physically impossible, and is likely a play on {{w|tire rotation}}). Second, he refers to "new character art" for his comic. The punchline here is that, since the characters are drawn in a [[stick figure]] style, there are no distinguishable features between the man here and most other males in the comic series. In addition, the fact that this stick figure should not have taken more than 10 seconds to draw makes the notion that Randall has been "working on" it ridiculous.
+
Here, [[Randall]] parodies this situation with two separate punchlines. First, he tells us that he has to go to the doctor to get his thighs rotated, which is medically unnecessary (as a "thigh rotation" is physically impossible). Second, he refers to "new character art" for his comic. The punchline here is that, since the characters are drawn in a [[stick figure]] style, there are no distinguishable features between the man here and most other males in the comic series. In addition, the fact that this stick figure should not have taken more than 10 seconds to draw makes the notion that Randall has been "working on" it ridiculous.
  
 
The title text refers to {{w|Megatokyo}}, a popular webcomic widely known for its use of filler art. Creator {{w|Fred Gallagher (cartoonist)|Fred Gallagher}}, who goes by his online moniker Piro, frequently makes use of what have come to be called "[http://www.megatokyo.com/index.php?strip_id=27 Dead Piro Days]", in which he posts character art, or concept art often based in the comic's world or characters, generally of draft or unfinished quality. By his own admission, these days of filler art are sometimes the result of nothing more than his feeling too under the weather, or tired, or emotionally depressed to put in the necessary amount of work to finish a proper update. While Gallagher has been raked over the coals for this by the broader webcomics community, longtime fans of Megatokyo tend to be highly tolerant and have been described as "[http://ca.ign.com/articles/2006/06/21/take-a-trip-to-megatokyo some of the most patient and forgiving]" readers, often viewing these lapses as endearing rather than inconvenient.
 
The title text refers to {{w|Megatokyo}}, a popular webcomic widely known for its use of filler art. Creator {{w|Fred Gallagher (cartoonist)|Fred Gallagher}}, who goes by his online moniker Piro, frequently makes use of what have come to be called "[http://www.megatokyo.com/index.php?strip_id=27 Dead Piro Days]", in which he posts character art, or concept art often based in the comic's world or characters, generally of draft or unfinished quality. By his own admission, these days of filler art are sometimes the result of nothing more than his feeling too under the weather, or tired, or emotionally depressed to put in the necessary amount of work to finish a proper update. While Gallagher has been raked over the coals for this by the broader webcomics community, longtime fans of Megatokyo tend to be highly tolerant and have been described as "[http://ca.ign.com/articles/2006/06/21/take-a-trip-to-megatokyo some of the most patient and forgiving]" readers, often viewing these lapses as endearing rather than inconvenient.

Please note that all contributions to explain xkcd may be edited, altered, or removed by other contributors. If you do not want your writing to be edited mercilessly, then do not submit it here.
You are also promising us that you wrote this yourself, or copied it from a public domain or similar free resource (see explain xkcd:Copyrights for details). Do not submit copyrighted work without permission!

Cancel | Editing help (opens in new window)
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Tools

It seems you are using noscript, which is stopping our project wonderful ads from working. Explain xkcd uses ads to pay for bandwidth, and we manually approve all our advertisers, and our ads are restricted to unobtrusive images and slow animated GIFs. If you found this site helpful, please consider whitelisting us.

Want to advertise with us, or donate to us with Paypal?