Talk:1110: Click and Drag

Explain xkcd: It's 'cause you're dumb.
Revision as of 09:58, 19 September 2012 by 132.230.1.28 (Talk)

Jump to: navigation, search

I swear, it's like he found out about us, and is now saying "Oh, yeah? Well how about this?" Other than the gripes of how hard it's going to be to get this thing explained, this one is pretty epic. lcarsos (talk) 08:08, 19 September 2012 (UTC)

I'm moving this here so that it doesn't get lost in the shuffle, and because it isn't really an explanation:

For those who get impatient scrolling around (and are a little savvy): download the .html file for the comic (index.html), and also the file 1110.js. Edit the .html file to use your 1110.js instead of the one from xkcd.com. Then edit 1110.js:
* remove the line "overflow: 'hidden',"
* change the "1"s into "4"s in  "for(var y=-1;y<=+1;y++)" and in "for(var x=-1;x<=+1;x++){"
* optionally, remove the line "$remove.remove();"  (warning: this will make it take up a lot of memory eventually!)
Then open the local copy in your web browser. Zooming out, scrolling, and zooming back in helps find the easter eggs.
75.111.63.192 (talk) (please sign your comments with ~~~~)

lcarsos (talk) 08:43, 19 September 2012 (UTC)

  • This Page's instructions say to zoom in and out when browsing the modified local file. My browser skills are rusty. I have Firefox, and when I zoom in and out, it zooms the whole page, rather than just the interesting bit. However, seeing as how there are 16000+ panels, I don't think I want to zoom it out quite so very far anyway. Firefox is notoriously bad when there are lots of images on a page (and yes, it cratered while I was exploring the original page). In any case, can someone clarify the use of zoom? 24.57.210.141 08:40, 19 September 2012 (UTC)

I started to comment some easter eggs. Come on, we can make it :-). -- Hkmaly (talk) 09:00, 19 September 2012 (UTC)

All is revealed here: http://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=4542367 - seriously. Links to downloads, full images, how to link directly to a point of interest and so on.

I found the left hand boundary of the page reasonably quickly. Once you cross the sea you get their pretty fast. I also found an X-Wing coming out of the ground quoting a line from just after the death star trench run.

For the pack rats, here is a .tar.gz of all the pngs. You can use these to reference where in the comic you are. Files are named <number><north/south><number><east/west>.png. So 1n8w.png is 1 north, 8 west. Let's get this thing done. lcarsos (talk) 09:12, 19 September 2012 (UTC)

Seems I'm really too slow, plus I have CSS problems (there are gaps between my rows) but I'll share what I did anyway. Create a file with .html extension with the following content (if you've downlaoded all the images already, you can change the code to use your local files) and you get a map of the world. --132.230.1.28 09:58, 19 September 2012 (UTC)
<!doctype html>
<html><head><title>Click and Drag</title>
<style>
table {
border-collapse: collapse;
}
td {
padding: 0px;
}
td.s {
background-color: black;
}
</style>
</head><body><table><script>
var x, y, src, cssClass;
for (y = -13; y <= 18; y++) {
	document.write('<tr>');
	for (x = -33; x <= 47; x++) {
		src = (y>=0?(y+1)+'s':-y+'n')+(x>=0?(x+1)+'e':-x+'w');
		cssClass = y>=0?'s':'n';
		document.write('<td class=' + cssClass + '><img width="64" height="64" src="http://imgs.xkcd.com/clickdrag/' + src + '.png"></td>');
	}
	document.write('</tr>');
}
</script>
</table>
</html>

ZIP upload

Hi,

I’ve locally downloaded all the tiles (there is 225 PNG files) and made a ZIP file of them, but when trying to upload it here the Special:Upload page says: “Permitted file types: png, gif, jpg, jpeg.” Do I have to upload each tile one by one or is there a way to exceptionally bypass this restriction? Thanks. — Ethaniel (talk) 09:13, 19 September 2012 (UTC)

Mh, seems I’m hours too late… — Ethaniel (talk) 09:14, 19 September 2012 (UTC)
I'm not sure we should upload each individual frame for this one. Though, we do need to have a discussion about how we're going to handle/archive/explain this one, because it's going to be big and tedius. Maybe some adventurous and hardy soul can stitch together grids of this so that we don't have the problem of having too much image (a single terapixel image will kill anyone's PC if they try to load it) and having so little (while the grids Randall's created are nice and bite-sized, it's hard to see the whole thing). lcarsos (talk) 09:20, 19 September 2012 (UTC)

It doesn't seem to be a terapixel. There are 225 images of 2048x2048 pixels. The full range is 81x32 tiles, resulting in a 165888x65536 images, at approximately 10 gigapixels. The naming conventions is numberlatitudenumberlongitude.png, where lat can be either n or s, and long can be either e or w. E.g. 1n1e.png, which is the starting image, and they are located at http://imgs.xkcd.com/clickdrag/.

I found two raptors. I couldn't even begin to tell you where they are. Follow the left side. Past the oceans and in some grass...somewhere. This is a lot to draw...I wonder how he did it. The shear size of each image, combined with the fact that they seamlessly transition together...when did he start? How much time did he put in? He should have waited one more to get comic 1111, I think. 76.122.5.96 09:29, 19 September 2012 (UTC)

The far right also quotes the very first xkcd comic ever. 76.122.5.96 09:39, 19 September 2012 (UTC)
Personal tools
Namespaces

Variants
Actions
Navigation
Tools

It seems you are using noscript, which is stopping our project wonderful ads from working. Explain xkcd uses ads to pay for bandwidth, and we manually approve all our advertisers, and our ads are restricted to unobtrusive images and slow animated GIFs. If you found this site helpful, please consider whitelisting us.

Want to advertise with us, or donate to us with Paypal or Bitcoin?