Editing 2101: Technical Analysis

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|A {{w|random walk}} is a mathematical object that describes a path that consists of a succession of random steps. Randall is trying to convince himself that the patterns in the stock chart are more meaningful than just random data. The {{w|Random walk hypothesis|random walk hypothesis}} is a financial theory that states that stock prices evolve according to a random walk, thus short-term price changes are random and cannot be predicted from past history.
 
|A {{w|random walk}} is a mathematical object that describes a path that consists of a succession of random steps. Randall is trying to convince himself that the patterns in the stock chart are more meaningful than just random data. The {{w|Random walk hypothesis|random walk hypothesis}} is a financial theory that states that stock prices evolve according to a random walk, thus short-term price changes are random and cannot be predicted from past history.
 
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|Slope!
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|Slope
|The {{w|slope}} of a graph is the ratio of the "vertical change" to the "horizontal change". A measure of slope on a financial chart can be used to predict possible specific returns or losses, or to analyze those from the past, but Randall simply prints the word in his chart annotation, with an exclamation point possibly indicating how exciting its value is, rather than labeling the actual numeric slope.  This could also be a play on a second meaning of slope, meaning a rising or falling surface in general.
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|The {{w|slope}} of a graph is the ratio of the "vertical change" to the "horizontal change". A measure of slope on a financial chart can be used to predict possible returns or losses, or to analyze those from the past, but Randall simply prints the word "slope" in his chart annotation, rather than labeling the actual numeric slope.  This could also be a play on a second meaning of slope, meaning a rising or falling surface in general.
 
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|Could be an omen
 
|Could be an omen

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