Editing 1118: Microsoft

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In the late 1990s {{w|Microsoft}} started bundling its web browser, {{w|Internet Explorer}}, with its {{w|Windows}} operating system. This effectively destroyed the {{w|Netscape}} company, who up until then had the most market share with its browser, {{w|Netscape Navigator}}. Microsoft was involved in {{w|United States v. Microsoft|a legal case}} against the U.S. government, which required Microsoft to allow IE to be uninstalled among other remedies. {{w|Removal of Internet Explorer|Removal of Internet Explorer}} has no clear solution as libraries and utilities associated with Internet Explorer are used across other Windows applications.
 
In the late 1990s {{w|Microsoft}} started bundling its web browser, {{w|Internet Explorer}}, with its {{w|Windows}} operating system. This effectively destroyed the {{w|Netscape}} company, who up until then had the most market share with its browser, {{w|Netscape Navigator}}. Microsoft was involved in {{w|United States v. Microsoft|a legal case}} against the U.S. government, which required Microsoft to allow IE to be uninstalled among other remedies. {{w|Removal of Internet Explorer|Removal of Internet Explorer}} has no clear solution as libraries and utilities associated with Internet Explorer are used across other Windows applications.
  
The comic sarcastically states that this stopped companies from creating a monopoly on software practices. Unfortunately, platform developers such as Apple, Sony, and Microsoft have restricted third-party software distribution over the internet via their own [http://www.apple.com/iphone/from-the-app-store/ curated] [http://store.sonyentertainmentnetwork.com/ online] [http://marketplace.xbox.com/en-US/ stores] in recent years, and will come full circle with the introduction of Metro Applications on the Windows 8. The comic also mocks the triviality of {{w|Browser wars|browser debates}} compared to current antitrust cases concerning [http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/01/12/googles-new-search-results-raise-privacy-and-antitrust-concerns/ privacy] and [http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-04-11/u-s-files-antitrust-lawsuit-against-apple-hachette.html price fixing].
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The comic sarcastically states that this stopped companies from creating a monopoly on software practices. Unfortunately, platform developers such as Apple, Sony, and Microsoft have restricted third-party software distribution over the internet via their own [http://www.apple.com/iphone/from-the-app-store/ curated] [http://store.sonyentertainmentnetwork.com] [http://marketplace.xbox.com/en-US/ stores] in recent years, and will come full circle with the introduction of Metro Applications on the Windows 8. The comic also mocks the triviality of {{w|Browser wars|browser debates}} compared to current antitrust cases concerning [http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/01/12/googles-new-search-results-raise-privacy-and-antitrust-concerns/ privacy] and [http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-04-11/u-s-files-antitrust-lawsuit-against-apple-hachette.html price fixing].
  
 
{{w|Apple}} bundled a browser in on both its desktop and mobile platforms.  Apple also requires all iOS developers to sell their apps only through the iTunes app store, paying sizeable commissions to Apple, and Apple can refuse to sell any app. In some instances, Apple has developed its own versions of popular third-party apps.[http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2011/10/serving-at-the-pleasure-of-the-king.html]   
 
{{w|Apple}} bundled a browser in on both its desktop and mobile platforms.  Apple also requires all iOS developers to sell their apps only through the iTunes app store, paying sizeable commissions to Apple, and Apple can refuse to sell any app. In some instances, Apple has developed its own versions of popular third-party apps.[http://www.codinghorror.com/blog/2011/10/serving-at-the-pleasure-of-the-king.html]   

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