Talk:1560: Bubblegum

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I believe the title text refers to the story about Calvin Coolidge about making a bet to not say 3 words.Blawho (talk) 04:51, 5 August 2015 (UTC)

Duke Nukem says: "It's time to kick ass and chew bubble gum...", not the other way around. Don't know if this is worth mentioning. Elektrizikekswerk (talk) 07:24, 5 August 2015 (UTC)

Thanks for the explanation, I didn't know the movie quote. With this info in mind, I now think that panel 2 shows that Cueball is perhaps not making friends, so he decides to just go for the chewing gum option?? 141.101.99.36 08:40, 5 August 2015 (UTC) I added that the dénouement was similar to something the naïve and childish Beret Guy would do, that okay? Completely sane (And not Anglo-Saxon) (talk) 11:27, 5 August 2015 (UTC)

The more I'm thinking about this thing the more I have to agree to 141.101.99.36. I think both possibilites should be mentioned in the explanation, since both behaviours would fit to Beret Guy's character. First: Comes in, says the quote (more or less) and does both, because he said he would. Second: Comes in says the quote, regarding the quote's origin having mind that only one of the options/actions have to be fulfilled and after looking at Cueball and Megan decides for "chewing gum" - or maybe "making friends" by gifting his bubblegum away... Elektrizikekswerk (talk) 07:35, 6 August 2015 (UTC)

He may also be making a reference to the reality show cliché "I didn't come here to make friends." 162.158.255.6 19:11, 5 August 2015 (UTC)

Title text

Title text only 16 words? I(1) came(2) here(3) to(4) chew(5) bubblegum(6) and(7) say(8) no(9) more(10) than(11) eighteen(12) words(13) ... and(14) I'm(15) all(16) out(17) of(18) --162.158.93.98 10:26, 5 August 2015 (UTC)

Title text 18 words, movie quote 16 words. Unless Randall takes the stuff in the movie quote as "bubble gum" where Randall's own text uses "bubblegum." Which is entirely possible, but weird. But then, what's not to like about "weird?" Taibhse (talk) 10:41, 5 August 2015 (UTC)
sorry, no native english - why is "I'm" counted as one word as it is "I am" which I would count as two words? Or is "don't" and "can't" also one word? -- 162.158.92.17 13:09, 5 August 2015 (UTC)
"don't" and "can't" are both also considered one word. In English, a contraction functions as one word, even though it combines multiple words. Don't bother asking why... the rules of English don't necessarily make sense. :-) Suspender guy (talk) 16:37, 5 August 2015 (UTC)
This is absolutely true. Basically, if it's not separated by spaces, it's one word, be there an apostrophe, hyphen or whatever. But the thing about English is not only do the rules not necessarily make sense, they don't necessarily exist, either, or if they do not everyone agrees on them, such as how many spaces to put after a period at the end of a sentence (used to be universally two, now that's quite rare); and whether to put punctuation inside or outside of quotation marks (I usually put it outside unless it's part of the quote, but that style is mainly restricted to computer manuals that are trying to avoid you typing in the sentence-ending period.) I still think English is harder to learn than Japanese (which is what most native English speakers cite as "a difficult-to-learn language") and I grew up speaking English.PsyMar (talk) 17:01, 5 August 2015 (UTC)

The description of the hovertext mentions "out of words" and "out of both"; might want to include the original, "out of bubblegum". Also, the deliberate truncation implies "out of time", which could relate to the possibility of it being a tribute to Roddy Piper.--Beth (talk) 12:44, 5 August 2015 (UTC)

I don't wanna change Randall's work - I just want to mention that I came here to chew bubblegum and say only sixteen words ... and I'm all out of would be more close to proposed origin where a) 16 words [with I'm= 1] and b) only positive descriptions used. -- 162.158.92.17 13:16, 5 August 2015 (UTC)

I don't see why it's so strange that he didn't use the same number of words. He wrote the sentence in a way that he liked, counted the words he used, then added one. There's no need to overthink this.173.245.50.142 19:08, 5 August 2015 (UTC)

I agree with you, but people here love to overthink. 173.245.50.154 20:07, 6 August 2015 (UTC)